Olive Oil Dough from Artisan Pizza and Flatbread In Five Minutes a Day

Jeff Hertzberg was one of the featured speakers at the 2017 National Festival of Breads held in Manhattan KS. He demonstrated recipes from the 2011 edition of Artisan Pizza and Flatbread In Five Minutes a Day. The book is one of many written by Herbzberg and Zoë Francois featuring their revolutionary method for bread making. Ingredients are literally thrown into a container and allowed to ferment; the gluten develops during the fermentation process without any kneading. Although the dough can be used within 3 hours, it’s best to let it set overnight; it is usable for up to 14 days and develops sourdough characteristics as it ages.
The dough used for flatbreads does contain oil unlike some of their other basic doughs.
Like the other 5-minute-recipes, this is a wet dough that does requires special attention that is detailed in each recipe.
Special equipment includes a baking stone and a peel for pizza making. I have neither but achieved great results using what I had . . . I’ll explain in the recipes that will follow — recipes that use the oil dough to make focaccia, pizza, pitta and other flatbreads.
Jeff Hertzberg @ 2017 National Festival of Breads in Manhattan, KS  
Check out Jeff & Zoë's website @ BreadIn5.
Olive Oil Dough from Artisan Pizza and Flatbread In Five Minutes a Day
Makes enough dough for at least eight ½-pound pizzas or flatbreads (about 12” across.) The recipe is easily doubled or halved.
3 1/4 cups lukewarm water (100° F or below)
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon granulated yeast 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon granulated sugar, honey, malt powder, or agave syrup
7 1/2 cups (scoop and sweep) unbleached all-purpose flour
  1. Add olive oil, yeast, salt, and sweeteners to the water in a 5-qart bowl or in a lidded (not airtight) plastic food container.
  2. Measure the flour using a “scoop-and-sweep” method (scoop flour and level off the top). Then mix in the flour. Although the original directions say to add the flour all at once, I find that I have an easier time incorporating it all evenly if I add half, stir and then add the last half. Don’t knead, it isn’t necessary.

  3. Allow to rise: Cover with a lid (not airtight), leave it open a crack for the first 48 hours. (I cover the top of the dough very loosely with plastic wrap to prevent drying). Allow the dough to rise at room temperature until it begins to flatten on the top, approximately 2 hours. Do NOT punch dough the dough!
  4. After rising, refrigerate and use over the next 14 days; the dough will develop sourdough characteristics with storage. Fully refrigerated wet dough is less sticky and is easier to work with than dough at room temperature. Once refrigerated, the dough will collapse, and it will never rise again the container—that’s normal.

Use this oil dough to make make focaccia, pizza, pita and other flatbreads . . .
Rosemary & Onion Focaccia
Pizza Margherita
Cheeseburger Pizza

Recipe without photos . . .
Olive Oil Dough from Artisan Pizza and Flatbread In Five Minutes a Day
Makes enough dough for at least eight ½-pound pizzas or flatbreads (about 12” across.) The recipe is easily doubled or halved.
3 1/4 cups lukewarm water (100° F or below)
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon granulated yeast 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon granulated sugar, honey, malt powder, or agave syrup
7 1/2 cups (scoop and sweep) unbleached all-purpose flour
  1. Add olive oil, yeast, salt, and sweeteners to the water in a 5-qart bowl or in a lidded (not airtight) plastic food container.
  2. Measure the flour using a “scoop-and-sweep” method (scoop flour and level off the top). Then mix in the flour. Although the original directions say to add the flour all at once, I find that I have an easier time incorporating it all evenly if I add half, stir and then add the last half. Don’t knead, it isn’t necessary.
  3. Allow to rise: Cover with a lid (not airtight), leave it open a crack for the first 48 hours. (I cover the top of the dough very loosely with plastic wrap to prevent drying). Allow the dough to rise at room temperature until it begins to flatten on the top, approximately 2 hours. Do NOT punch dough the dough!
  4. After rising, refrigerate and use over the next 14 days; the dough will develop sourdough characteristics with storage. Fully refrigerated wet dough is less sticky and is easier to work with than dough at room temperature. Once refrigerated, the dough will collapse, and it will never rise again the container—that’s normal.
Use this oil dough to make make focaccia, pizza, pita and other flatbreads.
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